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Of these corrupt manuscripts, the Codices Alexandrinus (5th Century), Vaticanus (4th Century) and, found in the 19th Century, Sinaiticus (4th Century) carry great weight of authority for use in modern versions. Thus modern versions seem to be based on a few corrupted versions of the New Testament.

John Burgon, an Oxford Professor of Divinity and Dean of Chichester, wrote ably in the nineteenth century in support of the Received Text and against the Minority Text that was being used for the Revised Version:

"I am utterly disinclined to believe - so grossly improbable does it seem - that at the end of 1800 years, 995 copies out of every thousand, suppose, will prove untrustworthy; and that the one, two, three, four or five which remain, whose contents were till yesterday as good as unknown, will be found to have retained the secret of what the Holy Spirit originally inspired. "I am utterly unable to believe, in short, that God's promise has so entirely failed, that at the end of 1800 years, much of the text of the Gospel had in point of fact to be picked by a German critic (Tischendorf) out of a wastepaper basket in the convent of St.Catherine; and that the entire text had to be remodelled after the pattern set by a couple of copies which had remained in neglect during fifteen centuries, and had probably owed their survival to that neglect; whilst hundreds of others had been thumbed to pieces, and had bequeathed their witness to copies made from them..." Burgon argued that the Vaticanus and Sinaiticus codices were not good but bad. The very fact that they were in good condition despite being exceptionally ancient was adequate proof of their being corrupt. Had they been sound, they would have been worn out by use long ago. Burgon's reasoning is sound. It would be very inconsistent to believe that God guided the church in identifying the Holy Spirit-inspired New Testament books but gave no guidance concerning the correct text of those books. If the Church was without the true New Testament text for 1500 years, how can we be sure that Vaticanus or Sinaiticus contain it?

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